Keeping Cannon community entertained with Skeet and Trap

Hats that have been used as targets at the skeet and trap range hang inside its lobby at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Feb. 13, 2018. The skeet and trap range has been regularly used since its opening over 40 years ago. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

John Underhill, 27th Special Operations Force Support Squadron Outdoor Recreation director, poses behind a bow target at the skeet and trap range at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Feb. 13, 2018. Underhill has worked on Cannon since 1992, and in recent years has overseen operations across the base on facilities ran by FSS, including the skeet and trap range. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

The skeet and trap range at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, dates back to the 1970’s. Older than most Airmen serving, it’s given Air Commandos another year-round recreational activity to choose from.

 

John Underhill, 27th Special Operations Force Support Squadron’s outdoor recreation center director, is someone who knows this range better than many.

 

“I see shooting as fun and very competitive,” Underhill said. “Shooting clay targets takes skill and practice to become good at it.”

 

The range offers Airmen and their families at Cannon AFB a place to fire their personal 12-gauge shotguns. Customers can go to Cannon AFB’s Outdoor Recreation facility and request a key to access the skeet and trap range’s lounge building Mondays and Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesdays to Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Once they have the building key, they can visit the range any time Saturdays and Sundays.

 

Adjacent to the firing range, the lounge comes with a small kitchen and a few tables, including an outside grill.

 

Customers bring their own clay targets to fire at and set up the machines that launch them. The installation requires more individual involvement to help maintain, but that’s part of the culture that runs through the grounds, Underhill explained.

 

If shooting guns isn’t an interest, a recent addition to the range welcomes those who prefer bows and arrows, with bow targets being placed on the range campus that can be utilized anytime at no cost.

 

Regardless of how or what you use at the range, safety precautions take priority, said Underhill.

 

“Customers should familiarize themselves with the weapon they’re using, be it a shotgun or a bow,” Underhill said. “Never shoot alone, either. Always point down the range when it’s time to fire. Always clear the weapon unless you’re shooting, and finally, never leave your weapon unattended.”

 

Heeding these precautions will ensure everyone at the range, and even those in charge of it, will have a worry-free, engaging time. Airmen and retirees using the skeet and trap range can enjoy what is one of many on-base activities that the 27 SOFSS maintains; each to ensure that Airmen remain motivated to stay resilient and maintain the mission at hand.