Karnival Kites soar above Cannon

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. - Children sprint for the pile of candy dropped from a kite during the 4th Annuall Kite Karnival at Cannon April 27. According to Community Center officials, more than 1,300 children and adults from the base and local communities attended  the festivites. (U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Trower)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. - Children sprint for the pile of candy dropped from a kite during the 4th Annuall Kite Karnival at Cannon April 27. According to Community Center officials, more than 1,300 children and adults from the base and local communities attended the festivites. (U.S Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Thomas Trower)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASEM N.M. - A train ride takes children on a ride during the 4th Annual Kite Karnival April 28 at Doc Stewart Park. An attempt to break the world's record for most kites flown simultaneously fell short, but an estimated 1,300 children and adults attended the event. (U.S Air Force photo by Yolanda Romero)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASEM N.M. - A train ride takes children on a ride during the 4th Annual Kite Karnival April 28 at Doc Stewart Park. An attempt to break the world's record for most kites flown simultaneously fell short, but an estimated 1,300 children and adults attended the event. (U.S Air Force photo by Yolanda Romero)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. - A gyro-flip ride spins a Kite Karnival-goer at the 4th annual event April 28 at Doc Stewart Park. An estimated 1,300 children and adultsfrom the base and local communities attended the festivities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yolanda Romero)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. - A gyro-flip ride spins a Kite Karnival-goer at the 4th annual event April 28 at Doc Stewart Park. An estimated 1,300 children and adultsfrom the base and local communities attended the festivities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Yolanda Romero)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. -- April was National Kite Month and Cannon celebrated it April 28 at Doc Stewart Park with its 4th Annual Kite Karnival for children and adults from the base and the community

An estimated crowd of more than 1,300 people enjoyed the festivities that included flying, kite making, carnival rides and exhibits. They also enjoyed traditional carnival-style foods like funnel cakes, roasted corn and cotton candy, according to project coordinator Cat Noll, Cannon Community Center director.

A main attraction for the event was Ollie the Octopus, an 88-foot long octopus kite flown by a member of the American Kite Association (AKA). The AKA was also responsible for helping hold a candy drop for children which dropped candy from 50 feet high before the children raced to the drop zone to claim the prize. The AKA High Fliers, a group of hobbyists from New Mexico, Colorado and Texas, were represent by 17 of its members bringing out giant kites that could be seen from far away soaring over the festivities.

An attempt to break the world record for most kites flown simultaneously was another item of interest for kite flyers, both professional and novice alike. Unfortunately, the event came up short of the 674 airborne kite's record, but that did not stop participants from being entertained, said Ms. Noll.

While there was no record set, kites were not in short supply as cases of simple white triangle kites were given to anyone who wanted to try to break the world record.

The record attempt and all of the festivities would not have been set up without the help of the more than 50 volunteers who set up, tore down and ran events throughout the day.

The Cannon Community Center is looking forward to attempting to break the world record again next year with the help of the base and local community, said Ms. Noll.