27th SOLRS: Vehicle maintainers

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanic, works on an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The M35 is typically used at Melrose Air Force Range, N.M., to combat brush fires. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanic, works on an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The M35 is typically used at Melrose Air Force Range, N.M., to combat brush fires. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle and Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanics, work together under an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The two are part of a team responsible for repairing the vehicle for Cannon’s civil engineer team. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle and Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanics, work together under an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The two are part of a team responsible for repairing the vehicle for Cannon’s civil engineer team. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Airman 1st Class Krystal Magallanes, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle management apprentice, is lifted in a deicer Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The vehicle is used to remove snow and ice from aerial assets during winter months. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Airman 1st Class Krystal Magallanes, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle management apprentice, is lifted in a deicer Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The vehicle is used to remove snow and ice from aerial assets during winter months. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Charles Aaron, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintainer, operates a deicer Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. This asset is just one in the more than 600 vehicle fleet Cannon vehicle maintainers are responsible for. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Charles Aaron, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle maintainer, operates a deicer Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. This asset is just one in the more than 600 vehicle fleet Cannon vehicle maintainers are responsible for. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanic, holds up a broken real axle from an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. This is one of the issues limiting functionality of the emergency response vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanic, holds up a broken real axle from an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. This is one of the issues limiting functionality of the emergency response vehicle. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle and Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanics, inspect components of an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The two are trouble-shooting several aspects of the non-operational vehicle needed by base fire fighters for emergency response. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle and Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanics, inspect components of an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. The two are trouble-shooting several aspects of the non-operational vehicle needed by base fire fighters for emergency response. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanic, demonstrates the difference between a serviceable and non-serviceable real axle Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. Vehicle maintainers cut costs and save the wing countless dollars by utilizing salvaged components when repairing vehicles in the Cannon fleet. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanic, demonstrates the difference between a serviceable and non-serviceable real axle Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. Vehicle maintainers cut costs and save the wing countless dollars by utilizing salvaged components when repairing vehicles in the Cannon fleet. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle and Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanics, work to remove a serviceable axle from a salvaged component for an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. Utilizing salvaged parts that are readily available cuts wait time that would exist if new parts were ordered and gets vehicles back to units faster. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

Senior Airman Lloyd Carlyle and Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron fire truck mechanics, work to remove a serviceable axle from a salvaged component for an out-of-service M35 fire truck Feb. 5, 2015 at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. Utilizing salvaged parts that are readily available cuts wait time that would exist if new parts were ordered and gets vehicles back to units faster. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexxis Mercer)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

Bruised limbs, cracked knuckles and aching backs; covered in sweat, dirt and oil - all just part of the job for select members of the 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron.

“It is like I always say, if your hands are not dirty at the end of the day, you have not been working,” stated Airman 1st Class Joshua Davis, 27th SOLRS fire truck mechanic.

The 27th SOLRS is comprised of four flights that provide a full spectrum of logistic needs for the 27th Special Operations Wing. This is accomplished through the efficient supply of material and fuels, expert management and maintenance of vehicles, performance of traffic management, and planning and oversight of the entire mobilization process to ensure accurate and rapid response in the wing’s commitment toward support of global operations.

While responsibilities for the squadron are vast, the vehicle management flight focuses on training all vehicle control officers, while shouldering the responsibility of keeping the wing’s enormous vehicle fleet serviceable.

Four core career fields exist within vehicle management: vehicle management and analysis, vehicle and vehicular equipment maintenance, fire truck and refueling maintenance and material handling equipment maintenance; with an additional 27th SOLRS career field cross flow of material management.

“These diverse fields mesh together to provide effective fleet management and efficient vehicle maintenance repair for the 27th SOW,” said Master Sgt. Ryan Adams, 27th SOLRS vehicle management and analysis section supervisor. “We have roughly 600 vehicles here that equate to an estimated $42 million fleet; the tempo of our wing’s operations keep our maintainers engaged in nearly every facet of Cannon’s mission.”

“From routine oil changes to complete overhaul and engine replacements, we take a certain pride and ownership of everything we touch,” he continued. “We focus on completing our part of the mission and doing it exceedingly well; part of the goal for us is ensuring every vehicle that rolls out of here can perform its duties, and effectively augment mission effectiveness – this is accomplished by our internal unit cohesion.”

Adams noted that this cohesion was tested during a severe snow storm the local area and base experience last month.

“That storm presented multiple challenges for our unit as much as the wing,” Adams said. “Our ability to keep somewhat aged assets mission-ready, with parts that are often difficult to find and replace, in order to clear the flightline, base roads and keep Air Commandos mobile forced us to think strategically and push our limits. Ultimately, I would say our team came out on top.”

“Our reach is a lot further than people would think,” he continued. “We play a major role in the generation of every sortie launched and recovered from Cannon. Think about it this way: We repair refueling vehicles, towing equipment, cargo loaders, munitions vehicles and fire engines…. If those are not repaired, aircraft are not getting the fuel they need, being taxied around the flightline, having pallets loaded, being armed, or on a runway that is safeguarded by emergency first responders. That is the big picture of vehicle maintenance; that is what we do.”

Editor’s note: This article is the third in a series highlighting group and unit contributions to the 27th Special Operations Wing and Air Force Special Operations Command missions.