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Senior Airman Brandon Conover, 27th Special Operations Air Maintenance Squadron hydraulics systems technician, has been working at Cannon for over two years now. He loves the feeling of ownership over an aircraft, as he plays a vital role in ensuring his aircraft, a MC-130J Commando II, can fly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) Keeping planes in the air
Senior Airman Brandon Conover, 27th Special Operations Air Maintenance Squadron hydraulics systems technician, has been working at Cannon for over two years now. He loves the feeling of ownership over an aircraft, as he plays a vital role in ensuring his aircraft, a MC-130J Commando II, can fly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T.
0 6/05
2018
Everett Young introduces himself at a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Feb. 2, 2018. Young hails from Scotland, and earned his U.S. citizenship at the event. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) Citizenship dreams realized for Cannon military spouses
For Everett Young, Jamie Andrews and Adelina Wheeler, February 2, 2018, will be marked as the day they became American citizens.
0 2/06
2018
Default Air Force Logo 27th SOMDG moves into new clinic
The 27th Special Operations Medical Group is currently undergoing their move into the newly-built clinic on base and will be fully operational Feb. 7, 2017.
0 2/05
2018
Lt. Col. Michael Campos, 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron commander, talks to an audience at a ceremony at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Jan. 26, 2018. The ceremony was held to honor the Dedicated Crew Chiefs, crew chiefs who’ve been designated as responsible for an aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) Cannon continues Dedicated Crew Chief tradition
Air crew members were honored in a Dedicated Crew Chief ceremony at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Jan. 26, 2018. The ceremony recognizes individuals for their role in maintaining aircraft across the Air Force, and instills a pride in ownership.
0 2/02
2018
Airman 1st Class Kolton McCasland, 27th Special Operations Support Squadron weather apprentice, answers a phone call at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Jan. 24, 2017. Part of a weather forecaster’s job is to communicate with leadership and pilots across base to ensure constant mission readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) Weather forecasting keeps the mission’s future clear
Have you ever walked into a dark room without a light? Would you travel somewhere new without any directions? There are many activities we can’t go into blindly, so when Cannon pilots prepare for flight, they need the help of 27th Special Operations Support Squadron weather forecasters to ensure their future is on the radar.
0 1/26
2018
Senior Airman Daniel Petrushev, 27th Special Operations Support Squadron Air Traffic Controller, poses for a portrait in his work environment at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Jan. 24, 2017. Petrushev is expected to attend Officer Training School in April. He is aiming high to become a U.S. Air Force pilot, an opportunity crafted from years of striving for success, failing and getting back up again. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) From Riverside to runway: An enlisted Airman’s journey to OTS
Senior Airman Daniel Petrushev, 27th Special Operations Support Squadron air traffic controller, will be shipped to Officer Training School this April. It’s the first step in accomplishing his dream of commissioning that began in Riverside, California.
0 1/23
2018
Firetruck and Refueling Maintenance specialists work on a 27th Special Operations Logistics Readiness Squadron vehicle at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Jan. 16, 2018. Airmen in this career field are the only ones Air Force-wide that are required to be able to operate on all government vehicles on their respective bases. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) Cannon firetruck maintainers keep mission well-oiled
When fires need to be put out, citizens call firefighters. When firefighters need their vehicles fixed, they call on firetruck maintainers. It’s a chain where one link can affect the rest.
0 1/18
2018
Military Working Dog Candy, retired 27th Special Operations Security Forces Squadron canine, is given a medal by the unit’s commander, Lt. Col. Mark Hamilton, during her and MWD Chandler’s retirement ceremony at Cannon Air Force Base, N.M., Nov. 9, 2017. Candy was deployed six times across the Middle East and became one of the most experienced and decorated military working dogs in the Department of Defense. From playful puppy to protecting Airmen: How the Air Force raises MWD’s
Candy is a military working dog with six deployments under her collar, and on Nov. 9, she was finally able to rest her paws when she officially retired from duty.
0 11/21
2017
John Boudreaux is a colonel in the U.S. Air Force. In 2016, he suffered a critical sudden cardiac arrest. He was dead for several minutes. Less than 6% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims survive the trip to the hospital. John's doctors gave him less than 1%. Today, as a group commander at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, he bears the scars that remind him for every one of him, there are 99 others buried in the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) A Cannon group commander’s story of survival
The sound of tire treads rolling over a smooth driveway was the only sound that could be heard on the street Col. John Boudreaux lived when he and his wife, Susi, pulled up to it. Susi shoved the gear shift to “Park.” She couldn’t do it fast enough, and sat back in the seat for a moment. She collected her thoughts as she closed her eyes and let her head fall back into the headrest. Her mind raced faster than her car could.
0 11/21
2017
. ‘Dirt boyz’ lay foundation for air power
It’s a common, definitely overused saying, but I’m going to say it: the Air Force is a machine, and every unit is a cog. When one fails, the rest struggle to keep the machine running. Every unit is important to the mission. At an Air Force Special Operations Command base, this rings especially true. My job is to highlight these parts of the mission, and connect it back to what makes them so important.
0 9/26
2017
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