HomeNewsArticle Display

Meet the hands that keeps CV-22 instruments working

.

Senior Airman Darrian Peterson works with Airman 1st Class Antonio Hill, both 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics technicians, on testing CV-22 Osprey instruments at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Oct. 10, 2018. Avionics test station and components specialists are responsible for ensure that systems remain perfectly calibrated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Circuit technology is on display at the 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron's avionics shop Oct. 10, 2018 at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico. Air Force aircraft are equipped with some of the world's most sophisticated electronic systems, and this requires well-trained Airmen to help run without skipping a beat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Airman 1st Class Antonio Hill, 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics technician, inspects CV-22 Osprey instruments at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Oct. 10, 2018. These professionals inspect and maintain everything from aircraft radar and weapons control to the testing equipment essential to the maintenance process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Airman 1st Class Antonio Hill, 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics technician, monitors equipment in his shop at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Oct. 10, 2018. These professionals inspect and maintain everything from aircraft radar and weapons control to the testing equipment essential to the maintenance process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Airmen at the 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics shop work on CV-22 Osprey parts at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Oct. 10, 2018. Some of avionics and componets Airmen's job proficiencies include maintaining aircraft electronic equipment such as radar and navigation technology, performing operational tests on test equipment, support equipmet and aircraft components, repairing both the aircraft equipment and the associated test equipment, and organize the facilities to ensure parts are stocked and available. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Circuit technology is on display at the 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron's avionics shop Oct. 10, 2018 at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico. Air Force aircraft are equipped with some of the world's most sophisticated electronic systems, and this requires well-trained Airmen to help run without skipping a beat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Airman 1st Class Antonio Hill works with Senior Airman Darrian Peterson, both 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics technicians, at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Oct. 10, 2018. These professionals inspect and maintain everthing from aircraft radar and weapons control to the testing equipment essential to the maintenance process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Airman 1st Class Pedro Ortiz and Eduardo Lopez, 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics technicians, open up a deployable workshop at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico, Oct. 10, 2018. Avionics test station and components specialists are responsible for ensuring that these systems remain perfectly calibrated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

.

Circuit technology is on display at the 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron's avionics shop Oct. 10, 2018 at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico. Air Force aircraft are equipped with some of the world's most sophisticated electronic systems, and this requires well-trained Airmen to help run without skipping a beat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer)

CANNON AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. --

The Air Force is equipped with aircraft that feature some of the most sophisticated electronic systems in the world. It requires a specialized career field with talented Airmen to maintain and keep the aircraft in top condition.

 

Here at Cannon, these Airmen work in the 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics shop, and are tasked with the unique mission to work on instruments of CV-22 Ospreys across the Department of Defense.

 

“The short and simple answer is we keep the CV-22 flying by repairing components and line replaceable units that are damaged or faulty,” said Tech. Sgt. Jesse Thorn, 27th Special Operations Maintenance Squadron avionics day shift production supervisor. “We also do many side projects for the squadron/wing and work closely with Air Force Repair Enhancement Program section to improve processes and practices to save the Air Force a ton of money.”

 

Some of avionics and components Airmen’s job proficiencies include maintaining aircraft electronic equipment such as radar and navigation technology, performing operational tests on support equipment, aircraft components and test equipment, repairing both the aircraft equipment and the associated test equipment, and organize the facilities to ensure parts are stocked and available.

 

“My favorite aspect of the job is troubleshooting and repairing a component or damaged circuit board as it is a skill that not everyone possesses,” Thorn said. “It gives me a great sense of accomplishment.”

 

With such a varied amount of tasks one Airmen is expected to carry out, a competent level of teamwork is required to complete the mission, and that’s what runs through the veins of the shop, according to Thorn.

 

“One of the unique challenges we face is we are the only shop of our kind currently in AFSOC, so the workload can get pretty intense at times,” Thorn said, “We overcome this through working together with an incredible team that is fully dedicated to accomplishing our mission and goals.”

 

It’s one of the final steps in a process of constant maintenance and readiness with Air Force aircraft. Like the steps before avionics and after, its role in the mission is vital, because nobody knows the sophisticated electronic systems installed in Air Force in the world quite like avionics.