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The Final Frontier

  • Published
  • By Airman 1st Class Drew Cyburt
  • 27th Special Operations Wing Public Affairs

Capt. Steven Pierre Jones, 43rd Intelligence Squadron operations training and mission readiness flight commander here, is slated to become the first intelligence officer to transfer to the U.S. Space Force on Feb. 1 next year.


With an Air Force career that spans over a decade of service and multiple deployments, Jones will bring expansive knowledge and experience to the ranks of the Space Force.


“I have been in a total of 13 years,” Jones said. “In my first eight years, I was enlisted aircrew on board aerial refueling aircrafts. I commissioned in September 2015, and went to Goodfellow Air Force Base shortly after to start intelligence officer training.”


After his graduation he came to Cannon, where he has spent the past few years. Even with all of his accomplishments in the Air Force, the desire to further his career always remained on the horizon.


“I have always wanted to explore the cyber and space domains of intelligence,” Jones said. “When I first heard the 14N (intelligence officer) career field was one of the common Air Force specialty codes that the Space Force needed, I immediately volunteered.”


Jones’ drive and desire ended up paying off as he was chosen to cross branches after his application was screened by Congress, marking the beginning of new endeavors and challenges for his career.


Having been deployed several times to including a tour in Afghanistan, two tours in Qatar, and two tours in Iraq, Jones is no stranger to globetrotting. He is scheduled to deploy once again next year, but this deployment will be different than any he has been on before.


“I will be the first Space Force Intel Officer to deploy as the special intelligence mission commander,” Jones said.


Breaking new ground is not the only thing Jones is interested in though. It’s not every day that a new branch of the military is created; the last time it happened was in 1947 when the Air Force was born. Being able to assist in the Space Force’s creation and shaping space intelligence was a huge reason that Jones volunteered in the first place.


However, his main reason for volunteering was simple. “Most importantly, I feel the move will provide better stability for my family,” Jones said. “My family and I are looking forward to living in Colorado and buying our first house. Generally now [officers] move every two to three years. But (at U.S. Space Force headquarters), I could literally stay for eight years because they have multiple squadrons: Denver and Colorado Springs are there.”


While family and breaking new ground are always important, Jones remain focused on the mission he set out to accomplish.
“Mission wise,” Jones added, “I look forward to learning everything about the space domain and meeting the key players and agencies specializing in Space Electronic Warfare and Orbital Warfare.”